Tag Archives: diet

Spring at Last: Brings New Focus

We in the northeastern USA have gotten through a strange winter all predicted by climate change science a few years ago. But now, the snow is gone, and it is springtime. Like most creatures in springtime, I have the normal animal urges to get out, plant, be productive, and feel connected with the great cycle of the seasons. My beloved and I were both down with some version of cold-bronchitis-flu for most of a month, and that only increased my usual winter ennui. So just now feeling focused, wanting to do more, like reconnecting via this blog. I have been storing up a few possible posts to share, and hope to be more regular for a while.

Blogs are a bit like diets; there is an initial excitement and intensity, then you slowly move to a kind of burnout phase when your interest wanes. But what does not wane is my absolute belief that our people are being made ill, and dying of diseases, caused by sugars, starches, and most artificial sweeteners. Death by diet. Our big-agri business has co-opted the government and medical establishment into supporting a way of eating that is not only unhealthy and fattening, but ultimately dangerous. A look at the western diet prior to the 1950s and now is evidence enough; a look at the change in obesity and diabetes rates during that time is appalling. Take a look at the stats found at these sites, more than enough to be disturbing:

http://www.diabetesandenvironment.org/home/incidence

http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_briefs/RB9043-1/index1.html

http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/PDFs/stat904z.pdf

http://authoritynutrition.com/11-graphs-that-show-what-is-wrong-with-modern-diet/

http://mpkb.org/_detail/home/pathogenesis/mortality.gif?id=home%3Apathogenesis%3Aepidemiology

I am not a person who buys into conspiracy theories (they take a level of cooperation almost impossible for any group of people), and I don’t believe what happened in our western food realm was an conspiracy, except the ultimate one ruled by money. The same issues were at play in the cigarette industry for decades; not until there was no denying the obvious fact that smoking was killing people in droves did anything finally get done to show the public that tobacco kills.

Here is a good interview with a soda representative that shows it is hard for an abuser to defend his/her abuse: https://youtu.be/g4nTuSKEJug

I have a couple new recipes to add to my recipe blog, so take a look there.

Yours in the burgeoning of spring,

Nan aka Sugarbaby

Research: Diet and Insect Behavior

I read this some months back, kept forgetting to post, but this research gives an indication that behavior is in part driven by dietary consumption. Who knows, maybe that’s why our politicians can’t seem to get any work done–they need to get off carbs.

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2013/06/following-the-swarm/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=fb-wall

Never Give Up

Let’s remember what sugar is. Sugar is not just the white granulated stuff in the sugar bowl, but it comes in many forms like corn syrup that is put into virtually all foods not purely raw vegetables; it is even injected into meats, especially deli meats. Sugar is also, as far as your body is concerned, anything made with grain, anything that has a carb count, such as the so-called starchy vegetables and fruits–squash, corn, bananas are the highest. So you might be eating what looks like a pretty good diet but still be getting more sugar than your body can handle.  To further make a mockery of our efforts, if one is already over weight, even eating very low carb, if you eat too much protein your liver can convert it to sugars which then will get stored as fat.

Happily, most people who eliminate the basic sugars will see good results in health and in weight loss, but there are some of us who will have to bird dog those sugars and get nearly all of them out of our diets if we want to lose excess fat. I happen to be one of those people, and recently decided to go on a ketogenic diet, for me less than 20 carbs per day, and I am glad to report I am once more losing the stubborn weight.  I also exercise, especially walking, several times a week, and this combination is working for me.

I don’t claim many virtues, but one I hang on to is I have determination, I don’t give up on things that matter to me; I just keep on trying expecting I will find an answer eventually.

If you are interested in the keto diet check out these sites I think are best for more information:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/1/1/2

http://aaron.emascc.com/diet/ebooks/Lyle_McDonald_-_The_Ketogenic_Diet.pdf

http://www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com/best-weight-loss-program.html

Bonus: Watch this great time lapse of girl who used keto diet to lose 88 pounds in a year:

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1010&sid=26734370

Yours in never giving up,

Nan aka Sugarbaby

After Accepting Sugar is a Problem

Even when you know that sugar-starch-artificial sweeteners are a problem, there are other issues to deal with. I went through the phase of trying to find low carb or paleo substitutes for the sweets and breads, and kept stalling in my weight loss. I finally realized that there are different problems with different levels of magnitude.

Food (meaning the SAD foods, the frankenfoods, the faux foods ) is a problem, we know we have to eliminate the foods we can’t control. After that there is the weight problem.

If you have a weight problem, which sadly most of us sugaraholics do, diets don’t work unless we see that we are changing to a new and healthy permanent way of eating; that a dessert now and then (preferably of our own making) is probably okay, but to not let the perfect be the enemy of the good. That eating only at table, and not with other distractions is very important, and a bit of exercise makes us feel a lot better as we allow nature to do its work. I heard a South American doctor point out that we don’t have to weigh and measure water, we will drink enough water even if that enough is not what the government or some diet books says is enough. If we stick to healthy choices, our bodies will tell us when we have had enough.

So what is left is the eating problem. If we are eating from boredom, bad habits like in front of the television, or late night grazing, these have very little to do with hunger if we are eating a at least a couple decent meals every day. Eating becomes its own activity, to fill up time, to give us comfort, to procrastinate, to assuage boredom, sadness, loneliness, fear, or any other emotion.  If we are eating aside from meals, we have an eating problem.

Of course, there may be some occasional exceptions, but I have decided I don’t want any exceptions if at all possible. Eating doesn’t fix problems in life, eating that’s not health driven only adds to life’s problems.

So consider whether your sugaraholic days have created the concomitant problem of using eating for the wrong reasons.  My guess is that people who seem to give up the bad foods and drop all their weight fairly quickly didn’t have the eating problem.

Somehow, seeing that eating aside from planned meals is the main problem is really making a difference for me.  The best analogy I can think of is constantly washing if you are already clean; we call that an obsessive compulsive behavior. I think eating that doesn’t have anything to do with hunger is no different.

I know I’m feeling my clothes getting looser, and feeling much happier about not constantly logging food, getting on the scale, and being so diet focused. Eating need not control our lives, and we can enjoy the good foods we have learned to eat, enjoy good health, and be free of the “diet” mentality.

Yours in discovery,

Nan aka Sugarbaby

Two Negatives Equals a Positive

One of the hardest things for a person is to appreciate when something did not happen. We seem to be able to if we can see it, like if the car stops at the edge of pit, or something visible and dramatic like that, but is is hard to appreciate a situation wherein a course of action prevented a catastrophe. People may or may not appreciate how great the danger actually was, or be in denial that a disaster had actually been imminent. When it comes to health we have a similar conundrum.

Had I not gotten off sugars-starch-most artificial sweeteners,  I know I would have become a diabetic, the trajectory was there;  but, because I did make changes, I did not become diabetic. Also, that I didn’t become morbidly obese is another thing that did not happen, though I know it would have had I kept eating the standard American diet (called SAD for a reason).  I had seen all these things happen to my mother, so I knew that these two consequences were highly likely if I did not make changes.

Yet, despite avoiding the worst, I have been unhappy that my weight would not come down faster, which is the problem of insulin resistance–the body stores fat, but doesn’t release it for energy. I get discouraged, and forget how much worse everything could be, and that I should be happy that the two big negative things did not happen. We are not well equipped to look at life this way, though; so it takes writing in a journal, blogging, or other aids to memory and positive thinking.

Trial and error is a friend, so I’ve been trying different diets to get some movement downward on the weight-loss; after everything else, or so it seems, I’m on a ketogenic diet which gives me great energy, good sleep, and voila the pounds are again coming off.

Sugar/starch is the cause of a lot of suffering, and I hope that younger people, like my children and grandchildren, will see that they will have much more positive health with by leaving out these negative foods.

Yours in trying,

Nan aka Sugarbaby