Tag Archives: sugar

Kids on Sugar

Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt has an excellent post on sugar and kids today:

http://www.dietdoctor.com/adhd-much-sugar

National Geographic Magazine article on Sugar

This is an interesting article on our history of consuming sugar, and the possible evolutionary influences that led our ancestors to eat fruits in the first place, and current concerns.

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2013/08/sugar/cohen-text

My Annual Winter Hibernation

I haven’t been blogging through the holidays, not because I have been so very busy, but that I am always one step from full blown hibernation through December until the middle of January. I don’t have SAD, seasonal affective disorder, which is associated with a low grade depression as less sun light is available. My issue is simply that I don’t want to do anything but sit in front of the fire reading, drinking many cups of tea, and sleeping a lot.

As a normally high energy person, I found this irritating during my clocking in years, since I couldn’t just go curl up whenever I wanted, but I was highly aware of my lower energy, and especially wanting to stay in bed or go to bed very early.  My theory is that this is a common evolutionary response that most people connect with the cold rather than the lack of sunlight, and it may be both, but it seems logical that our ancestors would have huddle together in their caves to preserve warmth and to preserve their energy stores aka fat levels.  They had worked very hard through the spring, summer, fall to put that energy on their bodies, and they knew that they would have to last out several months of very little food; obviously this would not be the case in warm regions, but true for those ancestors in the higher and lower regions of the globe.

A couple days ago I felt the lift of the lifting of the sun, and am now ready to get back to my normal activities.

I am happy to be reading that the no-sugar and low-sugar way of eating is getting more publicity with every day, which it great news. The doubters, along with those who benefit by our population being addicted to the sugars-starches-artificial sweeteners are not going to just step aside because the truth is getting some press. We still have to work at educating ourselves and those we care about if we want to have healthy lives unencumbered by the diseases of obesity.

The Kraken aka Sugar Beast

The deep brain desire for sugar does not ever entirely go away, though it can be, as it were, caged by denial of sugar-starch-artificial sweeteners. I am a writer who likes analogy, to have concrete mental images of those more abstract issues. For me, the Clash of the Titans movie, the first one I saw in 1981, had the beast, the Kraken, caged deep in the ocean by Poseidon who controlled it.  This was very powerful imagery;  as indeed all the Greek mythological gods and creatures were meant to  be.

As I struggled with a growing problem of cravings for carbohydrates, those urges/cravings were to me like the Kraken; if I could keep the beast caged, then I would be fine. Admittedly, it took me a while to figure out how to permanently lock the beast deep in my limbic brain. For me that is complete abstinence from modern sugars-starches, and all artificial sweeteners save a small amount of stevia.

Like the mythological Kraken, this is no beast to toy with; either it is caged, or it is running rampant over the landscape of my brain. For me it is extremely destructive on several levels, not the least of which is weight gain. Indeed, many people suffer from mental health issues that seem to miraculously go away once they go on a ketogenic or  very low carbohydrate paleo-type food plan.

So, if you are  also in the throes of the Kraken, be assured you, too, can cage the beast; but, beware, open the cage a little and it will come roaring to the surface once again, more powerful than ever.

Yours in being in control,

Nan aka Sugarbaby

Never Give Up

Let’s remember what sugar is. Sugar is not just the white granulated stuff in the sugar bowl, but it comes in many forms like corn syrup that is put into virtually all foods not purely raw vegetables; it is even injected into meats, especially deli meats. Sugar is also, as far as your body is concerned, anything made with grain, anything that has a carb count, such as the so-called starchy vegetables and fruits–squash, corn, bananas are the highest. So you might be eating what looks like a pretty good diet but still be getting more sugar than your body can handle.  To further make a mockery of our efforts, if one is already over weight, even eating very low carb, if you eat too much protein your liver can convert it to sugars which then will get stored as fat.

Happily, most people who eliminate the basic sugars will see good results in health and in weight loss, but there are some of us who will have to bird dog those sugars and get nearly all of them out of our diets if we want to lose excess fat. I happen to be one of those people, and recently decided to go on a ketogenic diet, for me less than 20 carbs per day, and I am glad to report I am once more losing the stubborn weight.  I also exercise, especially walking, several times a week, and this combination is working for me.

I don’t claim many virtues, but one I hang on to is I have determination, I don’t give up on things that matter to me; I just keep on trying expecting I will find an answer eventually.

If you are interested in the keto diet check out these sites I think are best for more information:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/1/1/2

http://aaron.emascc.com/diet/ebooks/Lyle_McDonald_-_The_Ketogenic_Diet.pdf

http://www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com/best-weight-loss-program.html

Bonus: Watch this great time lapse of girl who used keto diet to lose 88 pounds in a year:

http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1010&sid=26734370

Yours in never giving up,

Nan aka Sugarbaby

A Sugar Addict’s E-book

This is a good resource for sugaraholics: 

http://authoritynutrition.com/viciouseating.pdf

Sugar is Dangerous

Yet another article showing study reaults that make clear sugar is dangerous.

http://digitaljournal.com/article/344595